Tag Archives: addiction

Adult Children of Alcoholics

It will never happen to meAdult Children of Alcoholics: “Upon reaching adulthood, the majority of children of alcoholics continue to experience problems related to trust, dependency, control, identification and expression of feelings.” – Claudia Black It Will Never Happen to Me: Children of Alcoholics As Youngsters-Adolescents-Adults

The Real Scoop on Narcissism from Cause to Lived Experience

Narcissism South Lake Union TherapyIn our culture, the term naricissist is used often, informally and carries a pejorative connotation.  Jari Chevalier’s podcast, Living Hero, examines narcissism from all angles and provides a more humanistic perspective on the clinical meaning of the word. Continue reading

The Real Cause of Addiction

Broken Heart The Real Cause of Addiction

This is one of the best articles on addiction I’ve read in a long time.  It echoes what I have seen and experienced around attachment and safety the lengths to which humans will go to find comfort in their absence.  Continue reading

Book Recommendations

Book Recommendations

Of all the books I have read recently, these are my favorites.

What I liked most about Coming Apart is the author’s framing of “failed” relationships not as failures but as developmental tools which promote growth and awareness.

Coming Apart South Lake Union Therapy

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R.I.P. Robin Williams

Robin WilliamsR.I.P. Robin Williams

I suspect that Robin William’s immense talent and his chronic struggle with addiction were inextricably linked in ways most of us will never understand. In the words of Gabor Mate, “The difference between passion and addiction is that between a divine spark and a flame that incinerates.” Continue reading

Shame- The Atlantic Monthly

Scarlet LetterShame- The Atlantic Monthly

I came across this article on shame by Robert Karen in the bibliography of a presentation on narcissistic wounding and the part it plays in addiction. In his article, Karen includes the historical and social aspects of shame as well as the individual experience. He draws a distinction between “normal” and “pathological” shame.  “Pathological shame is an irrational sense of defectiveness, a feeling not of having crossed the boundary but of having been born there.”

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