Category Archives: Narcissism

The Real Scoop on Narcissism from Cause to Lived Experience

Narcissism South Lake Union TherapyIn our culture, the term naricissist is used often, informally and carries a pejorative connotation.  Jari Chevalier’s podcast, Living Hero, examines narcissism from all angles and provides a more humanistic perspective on the clinical meaning of the word. Continue reading

Are We All “Screwed Up?”

NeurosisAre We All “Screwed Up?”

I get asked this question a lot and the answer is, “yes.” This is comforting to many and not such welcome news to others. In the psychological world, “screwed up” is better known as “neurotic.” Psychoanalyst Karen Horney described neurosis as “a distorted way of looking at the world and oneself, determined by compulsive needs rather than by a genuine interest in the world as it is.” Yep. Unfortunately we all do this to one degree or another, in one or more areas of our lives. The extent to which this occurs is in proportion to the severity of the mental and emotional suffering we experience. Continue reading

Shame- The Atlantic Monthly

Scarlet LetterShame- The Atlantic Monthly

I came across this article on shame by Robert Karen in the bibliography of a presentation on narcissistic wounding and the part it plays in addiction. In his article, Karen includes the historical and social aspects of shame as well as the individual experience. He draws a distinction between “normal” and “pathological” shame.  “Pathological shame is an irrational sense of defectiveness, a feeling not of having crossed the boundary but of having been born there.”

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Narcissism vs The Healthy Self

NarcissusNarcissism vs The Healthy Self

 

“Vanity and narcissism- the compulsive need to be admired and praised- undermines one’s courage, for one then fights on someone else’s conviction rather than one’s own.”- Rollo May


Self-esteem, sense-of-self and ego are all terms used to describe oneself as distinct from the world and others.  It is the opinion a person has about themselves.

Psychological health hinges on a healthy sense of self which is formed in infancy and early childhood.  When all parts of ourselves are accepted during this period of development, not just the ones prized by society or our culture we, in turn, develop the ability to accept all aspects of ourselves and to tolerate our imperfections. Continue reading